Ukulele & Languages

Different countries,
Different cultures
one common language... the ukulele.

Posts Tagged ‘language’

Learning Icelandic on Learn Icelandic Online takes up a lot of my time these days. I have promised myself I would not travel to Iceland before I am able to hold a basic conversation in Icelandic.
As part of my learning, I like to read Icelandic newspapers online, both in Icelandic and in English.
Tonight I stumbled upon this post on IceNews and felt I had to share this extract with you :

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A friend of mine pointed me to this great video in which David Crystal, a renowned British linguist and his son, Ben Crystal, actor and writer, explain how Shakespeare‘s plays performed in the accent that was in use at Shakespeare‘s time reveal many puns and jokes that are lost in modern pronunciation. Read more on Original Pronunciation (OP), on David Crystal’s dedicated website.

In this video, you will be able to listen to several excerpts from a few Shakespeare‘s plays in both modern and original pronunciations. Ben Crystal also explains how performing Shakespeare in Original Pronunciation affects his acting. You need not worry, although there are many differences between modern and original pronunciations, you will still be able to understand the plays performed in original pronunciation !

I strongly recommend David Crystal‘s The Cambridge Encyclopedia of the English Language, one of my favourite books.

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After a much needed long break I am back to share a ukulele song in a language not yet featured on Ukulele & Languages: Gujarati ( Gujarātī).

Many thanks to Canadian language lover and ukulele player Peter Forrest who informed me that he had endeavoured to learn a song in Gujarati.

The song, a poem for children, is called Aav Re Varsaad (Inviting Rain) and Peter has had the good idea to add the lyrics to the video.

I  tried in vain to find a full translation of the lyrics. This site however, besides inviting you to try out a Gujarati recipe, provides an explanation of the first verses:

” Let the rain spread its shower again and again, to enjoy the hot chapatis (Roti) with bitter Gourd curry”.

Here are the lyrics :

Aav re varsaad

Aav re varsaad, dhebariyo parsaad,
Ooni ooni rotli ne Kaarela nu shaak.

Aav re varsaad, nevale paani,
Nathaaree chhokree ne dedke taani.

Aav re varsaad, dhebariyo parsaad,
Ooni ooni rotli ne kaarelaa nu shaak

As I didn’t know anything about the Gujarātī language, I used this excellent opportunity to become less ignorant and to do a bit of research.

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If you’ve been trying to learn French lately and have used the following method, well… you might have found it dead easy too.

I am however not convinced that you have managed to impress any French speakers.

All right, don’t look so miserable, I do sympathize. Let me try and suggest an alternative method for improving your French vocabulary. An alternative method involving our favourite instrument, the ukulele.

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Just like my previous trips to China, last week’s trip to Beijing brought quite a few opportunities to chuckle at some weird uses of English displayed on various signs.

Let me show you some examples, ahem… this way please… I mean, this way…

One thing you can’t complain about in China is the lack of directions… nothing is left to your imagination…

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Language Fun

A place for language lovers where I’m trying to demonstrate how fun it is to learn other languages and how much of a culture you understand through its language.
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